Diversity, Equity and Inclusion

April Celebrations

Armenian History Month

Diversity Month

Where Diversity is Embraced and Pathways are Created.

JVS SoCal fosters and sustains a culture of diversity, equity and inclusion. Our commitment is to ensure all stakeholders have access to resources and opportunities to develop, contribute and grow.

JVS SoCal has a 90-year history of serving multi-cultural and disadvantaged communities and advocating on issues of public policy that impact the individuals we serve. 

 

We are also committed to building a more vibrant, diverse and inclusive culture for our workforce.  Our team members are our greatest asset so it is our imperative to create an environment in which all employees are included, treated with respect, and are presented with opportunities to contribute and grow.

We recognize that we have a long way to go, have a lot of work to do, and much to learn.  But we are committed to continued and progressive betterment. 

    66%

    of the  JVS SoCal staff is composed of people of color

    More than  75%

    of our staff identify as female

    25%

    of Senior Leadership are women

    38%

    of Senior Leadership are
    people of color

    27%

    of our staff are Veterans

    More than  73%

    of our staff are minorities

    Veterans are part of our Culture

     

    JVS SoCal created the innovative Veterans First program, with the generous support of public and private donors. Many of our team members are veterans themselves and together, we are uniquely qualified to assist you in the transition from the military to the civilian workplace.

    Veterans are part of our Culture

     

    JVS SoCal created the innovative Veterans First program, with the generous support of public and private donors. Many of our team members are veterans themselves and together, we are uniquely qualified to assist you in the transition from the military to the civilian workplace.

    Immigrants are part
    of our History

     

    JVS SoCal implemented unconscious bias training sessions for all staff members to help foster a more inclusive culture.

    Immigrants are part
    of our History

     

    JVS SoCal implemented unconscious bias training sessions for all staff members to help foster a more inclusive culture.

    LGBTQ is part
    of our Strength

     

    JVS SoCal proudly partners with TransCanWork, a nonprofit committed to providing career services for gender diverse populations and workplace inclusivity training for employers. 

    LGBTQ is part
    of our Strength

     

    JVS SoCal proudly partners with TransCanWork, a nonprofit committed to providing career services for gender diverse populations and workplace inclusivity training for employers. 

    Racial and Ethnic Equality is our Goal

    We are committed to providing opportunities for learning, community building and celebrating diversity.

    Racial and Ethnic Equality is our Goal

    We are committed to providing opportunities for learning, community building and celebrating diversity.

    Monthly Celebrations

    Armenian History Month

    The Board of Supervisors recognizes the vast contribution of the Armenian community to our county’s economy and culture and chose April to celebrate their rich history.

     During Armenian History Month, L.A. County  celebrates the culture and heritage of the Armenian people worldwide and their contributions to our society as well as recognize the dark days of the Armenian Genocide.

    Diversity Month

    April is Diversity Month, a time to recognize and celebrate other cultures and populations. This month, take time to recognize the diversity in your workplace, school or home. By celebrating the unique cultures, backgrounds and traditions of others, we can gain a greater appreciation for the diversity that surrounds us.

    Employee Appreciation Day

    Employee Appreciation Day is an official holiday observed on the first Friday in March. It is a day for companies to thank their employees for their hard work and effort throughout the year. This day was created for the purpose of strengthening the bond between employer and employee.

    Many publications such as Inc. magazine, Forbes, and Boston.com, are writing about the holiday to remind employers to recognize and reward employee effort and to offer tips for building a stronger corporate culture through appreciation. Showing employees appreciation can result in a company’s higher retention rate, not only increasing the productivity of employees but the company as a whole.

    February - Black History Month

    Black History Month is an annual celebration of achievements by African Americans and a time for recognizing their central role in U.S. history. Also known as African American History Month, the event grew out of “Negro History Week,” the brainchild of noted historian Carter G. Woodson and other prominent African Americans. Since 1976, every U.S. president has officially designated the month of February as Black History Month. Other countries around the world, including Canada and the United Kingdom, also devote a month to celebrating Black history.

    27 Jan - International Holocaust Remembrance Day

    The United Nations General Assembly designated January 27—the anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz-Birkenau-as International Holocaust Remembrance Day.

    The Holocaust profoundly affected countries in which Nazi crimes were perpetrated, but also had universal implications and consequences in many other parts of the world. Member States share a collective responsibility for addressing the residual trauma, maintaining effective remembrance policies, caring for historic sites, and promoting education, documentation and research, seven decades after the genocide.

    This responsibility entails educating about the causes, consequences and dynamics of such crimes so as to strengthen the resilience of young people against ideologies of hatred.

    18 Jan - Martin Luther King Jr. Day

    The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. Day, observed this year on Jan. 18, became a national holiday in 1983, 15 years after the death of the civil rights leader. He advocated the use of nonviolent means to end racial segregation, he first came to national prominence during a bus boycott by African Americans in Montgomery, Alabama, in 1955. He founded the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in 1957 and led the 1963 March on Washington. The most influential of African American civil rights leaders during the 1960s, he was instrumental in the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which outlawed discrimination in public accommodations, facilities, and employment, and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. King was awarded the Nobel Prize for Peace in 1964.

    His legacy endures, and in a moment of national racial reckoning, the holiday offers a timely opportunity to help it onward, through action and contemplation. Marches and parades, the typical forms of remembrance, are mostly on pause this year.

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